Feeder Survey Fall 2022

Sep 9, 2022 | Bird Feeder Survey, The Sandpiper

The day after we cleaned out last year’s nesting material from a House Wren’s box the male proceeded to pack it with twigs as long as 9 inches long, it’s hard to believe that a bird as tiny as a wren could ever fit inside not to mention raise a brood of up to seven babies, Wrens usually place spider egg sacs mixed in with the twigs, the theory is that when the spiders emerge they help keep the mite population down as the mites are very harmful to young birds. 

The male wren usually makes a few nests, the female chooses one and maybe redecorates, she lays one egg a day until there are 6 or 7 then incubates them for about 12 to 15 days leaving occasionally to eat. After the eggs hatch both parents feed the young. After raising The first brood she may raise a second in a different nest, while he is still feeding the first brood. The wrens in my yard are already starting their second brood in an old abandoned box that we forgot to clean out. Aside from nest boxes they have been known to nest in anything convenient like tree holes, old hats, discarded shoes, pipes and old cans. 

The House Wren is a tiny drab bird about 5 inches long, male and female are very similar. The male sings constantly and has an unlimited repertory; the female seems to only sing occasionally during the mating period. These tiny birds (they weigh about as much as 2 quarters) will compete fiercely for a nest site sometimes dragging eggs and nestlings out of a site they desire. It is not advisable to place House Wren nesting boxes near Bluebird, Chickadee or Tree Swallow boxes as the wrens will destroy their nests. 

So far a pair of Mockingbirds raised at least one brood in my hedges, (they may raise 2 or 3 broods). Once the babies, were out of the nest, both parents wore themselves out to feed and protect them. Woe to bird, squirrel, or human to interfere – you would immediately be dive bombed by one or two manic parents.

Cooper’s hawk _ 

Rock pigeon _

Mourning Dove _

Monk Parakeet _ 

Red-bellied Woodpecker _

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker _

Downy Woodpecker _

Hairy Woodpecker _

Northern Flicker _

Blue Jay _ 

American Crow _

Black-capped Chickadee _

Tufted Titmouse _ 

Red-breasted Nuthatch _ 

White-breasted Nuthatch _

Carolina Wren _

American Robin _

Northern Mockingbird _

Brown Thrasher_

European Starling _ 

Towhee _ 

Fox Sparrow _ 

Song Sparrow 

White-throated Sparrow _ 

Dark-eyed Junco _ 

Northern Cardinal _

Red-winged Blackbird _

Common Grackle_ 

Brown-headed Cowbird _

House Finch _

American Goldfinch _

House Sparrow _

White-throated Sparrow _ 

Dark-eyed Junco _ 

Northern Cardinal _

Red-winged Blackbird _

Common Grackle_ 

Brown-headed Cowbird _

House Finch _

American Goldfinch _

House Sparrow _ 

OTHER SPECIES

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Participants of our November 5 nature walk to Suffolk County Farm were treated to a hands-on ornithology lesson from long-time GSBAS member Mike Cooper.

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West Sayville, NY 11796

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